50 Years of Integer Programming 1958-2008: From the Early Years to the State-of-the-Art

In 1958, Ralph E. Gomory reworked the sphere of integer programming whilst he released a paper that defined a cutting-plane set of rules for natural integer courses and introduced that the strategy might be subtle to offer a finite set of rules for integer programming. In 2008, to commemorate the anniversary of this seminal paper, a different workshop celebrating fifty years of integer programming used to be held in Aussois, France, as a part of the twelfth Combinatorial Optimization Workshop.

It comprises reprints of key historic articles and written models of survey lectures on six of the most popular issues within the box by means of uncommon participants of the integer programming neighborhood. necessary for someone in arithmetic, desktop technology and operations study, this publication exposes mathematical optimization, in particular integer programming and combinatorial optimization, to a wide audience.

Show description

Quick preview of 50 Years of Integer Programming 1958-2008: From the Early Years to the State-of-the-Art PDF

Similar Mathematics books

Selected Works of Giuseppe Peano

Chosen Works of Giuseppe Peano (1973). Kennedy, Hubert C. , ed. and transl. With a biographical caricature and bibliography. London: Allen & Unwin; Toronto: college of Toronto Press.

How to Solve Word Problems in Calculus

Thought of to be the toughest mathematical difficulties to unravel, note difficulties proceed to terrify scholars throughout all math disciplines. This new identify on the planet difficulties sequence demystifies those tricky difficulties as soon as and for all through exhibiting even the main math-phobic readers basic, step by step information and methods.

Discrete Mathematics with Applications

This approachable textual content stories discrete gadgets and the relationsips that bind them. It is helping scholars comprehend and follow the facility of discrete math to electronic computers and different smooth functions. It offers first-class guidance for classes in linear algebra, quantity thought, and modern/abstract algebra and for laptop technology classes in info buildings, algorithms, programming languages, compilers, databases, and computation.

Concentration Inequalities: A Nonasymptotic Theory of Independence

Focus inequalities for features of autonomous random variables is a space of chance concept that has witnessed an exceptional revolution within the previous couple of many years, and has purposes in a large choice of components reminiscent of computer studying, information, discrete arithmetic, and high-dimensional geometry.

Extra resources for 50 Years of Integer Programming 1958-2008: From the Early Years to the State-of-the-Art

Show sample text content

653 17. five solving variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 653 17. 6 Symmetric polyhedra and similar issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 656 17. 7 Partitioning difficulties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 658 17. 7. 1 Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 659 17. 7. 2 Partitioning orbitope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 660 17. 7. three uneven representatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 662 17. eight Symmetry breaking inequalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663 17. eight. 1 Dynamic symmetry breaking inequalities .

399 12. five Jack Edmonds, polynomial-time algorithms, and polyhedral combinatorics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 12. 6 growth within the resolution of the TSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 12. 7 Widening the sphere of program within the Nineteen Eighties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 Contents xvii 12. eight Optimization ≡ Separation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 12. nine cutting-edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 thirteen Reformulation and Decomposition of Integer courses .

795 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 797 half IV DVD-Video / DVD-ROM Part I The Early Years 2 In 1947, George Dantzig created the simplex set of rules, which used to be as a consequence released in 1951. This landmark paper defined a finite approach for optimizing a linear target functionality topic to a finite set of linear constraints. It was once already famous that this sort of challenge, known as a linear programming challenge, happened in a very good many events. in addition, Dantzig’s simplex technique was once proving to be very potent in perform.

199 Jack Edmonds eight Reducibility between Combinatorial difficulties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Richard M. Karp nine Lagrangian leisure for Integer Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Arthur M. Geoffrion 10 Disjunctive Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Egon Balas 7 xv xvi Contents half II From the Beginnings to the cutting-edge eleven Polyhedral ways to combined Integer Linear Programming . . . . . 343 Michele Conforti, G´erard Cornu´ejols, and Giacomo Zambelli eleven.

586 15. four. 1 mounted measurement and linear constraints: An FPTAS . . . . . 587 15. four. 2 Semi-algebraic units and SOS programming . . . . . . . . . . . . 597 15. four. three Quadratic services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 15. five worldwide optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604 15. five. 1 Spatial Branch-and-Bound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605 15. five. 2 Boundary circumstances of complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607 15. 6 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.69 of 5 – based on 23 votes